The lazy programmer

I was having a chat with an old time ThoughtWorks developer, the topic was trending towards voluminous work and long days at work. I interjected with the point that the developers should not be willing to work long and hard hours, instead they should be lazy so that there are better tools and automations coming out of them, rather than checking boxes on long todo lists for the day.

He thought for a while and then replied “You are right, the CruiseControl continuous integration tool was born out of laziness”. He went on to explain that one of the developers felt that it was too annoying to walk up to a computer, pull code out and run the build & tests. So the person put a build loop on that machine to do that task. Someone else put a web interface to it and there a new tool was born. It left a lasting legacy in the continuous integration space. (Cruise control home page).

Why do people relate long working hours to prosperity?

The industrial revolution required a good deal of unskilled labourers who were given instructions and repetitive tasks to be done. The more they do, the more money the company makes. So overtime was rewarded with more money and people tend to stay longer to get paid overtime. The invention part of automating the repetitive tasks were left to someone else, the thought of hard and long work is rewarding stayed on even though there was a chance of a new invention that could take this entire category of job away.

After many decades of advancements in the industrial space, automations have taken a majority of space. The place where the automation as of now is not able to get into are creative spaces or knowledge work. If a job requires more than few simple steps then it is beyond the mechanical skills and involves cognitive skills. The moment when even rudimentary cognitive skills are involved, then no longer any of those incentives and hour based pay work. It is explained well in the video created from the work of Dan Pink, the author of the book Drive.

Wisdom gets passed on through generations, bosses and workers alike, people were conditioned from the childhood that hard and long work is the only way prosper. When that person becomes the boss, demands the hours and when that person is the worker, obliges to it.

Programming is a step further, it involves complex thinking which requires us to bring deeper parts of our brain to work. Andy Hunt in his book The Pragmatic Programmer talks about L-mode and R-mode, which is about using our linear mode of the brain or the rich/random mode of the brain. Though there is value for linear mode, programming benefits a great deal from the R-mode. Staring outside the window, doodling, watching the fountain, a stroll could all be more productive activities than staring at the screen and furiously typing commands for long hours because new ideas pop out when you are least expecting and unprepared.

A programmer has to be lazy, should not jump into the task at hand instead approach programming with a mindset of ‘No code is the best code’. Laziness will make us look for to remove mundane repetitive tasks out of the way which will also pop up more creative ideas through R-mode. Workplaces should also help ease the norms of equating the number of hours in seat to productivity.

Push the problem out of your foreground mind, and just “hold it lightly”. Then go for a walk, etc. That’s when insights and breakthroughs come to me.— Henri Poincaré
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s